Archives / LIS Special Topics

   
  Summer 2015
   

 

Digital Humanities (2970)

This course will investigate the ways in which humanists are using digital tools and digital techniques in their research, and the relationship between those tools and techniques and the information sciences. Not only will the course address the major theoretical themes present in the study of the digital humanities today, it will also give the students the opportunity to gain experience curating, manipulating and visualizing digital data from the humanities and social sciences. We will then also investigate different approaches to engaging with data-intensive projects in these fields, including the potential applications of such resources in the educational, library and archival environments.

Creative Engagements with Digital Technology (2970)

Designed for students interested in critically thinking about ways to bring together creativity and technology in their own work or in collaborations, this seminar explores vital questions about the complex relationships between contemporary forms of creativity and information technologies in increasingly – but not universally – digital cultures. How are traditionally analog forms of creation influenced by developing digital technologies? What are the cultural implications of emerging forms of creativity deeply intertwined with technologies? How are these new forms being taken up by artists, technologists, academics, marketing firms, and people in everyday life? To tackle these questions, students will work with academic literature from a variety of fields; engage with and analyze relevant projects; and experiment with digital tools in a highly collaborative and reflexive classroom.

Introduction to Mobile Information and Communication Technologies (2970)

This course introduces students to the landscape of mobile information and communication technologies—their history, present, and future. It examines the social and technical history of mobile communication and information technologies, defined as any system designed to gather, process, or distribute information through network architecture. We will consider a wide range of mobile ICTs: from mobile phones, to mobile app platforms, to location standards, to cryptocurrency protocols. How do mobile ICTs shift the ways we communicate and create cultural memory? How do mobile devices currently figure into information institutions, such as libraries, museums, and archives? How does the incorporation of mobile ICTs shift, complicate, or transform the traditional services that these information institutions provide? What are the current trends in mobile app ecosystems, how will they change, and how can information institutions adapt to these shifts? By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the history of mobile ideas, the affordances of second and third generation mobile networks (2G, 3G, 4G, LTE), and the social and political debates surrounding the shifts from mobile telephony to mobile computing, including media created and transmitted with mobile devices and mobile information systems.

  Spring 2015
   

 

Research Data Infrastructure (2970)

This seminar program will build on LIS 2975 Seminars Special Topics Research Data Management, and will focus on the elements of research data infrastructure which facilitate and enable effective data management. The program will examine approaches to data storage, data repositories and preservation practice, selected standards, schema, protocols and formats for describing datasets, data registries and catalogs enabling data discovery and the data publication process. We will explore developments in data citation and metrics to track data provenance and attribution. In each of the listed areas, there will be case studies and exemplars to illustrate the challenges and experiences of pilot implementations and fully operational services. Finally we will also consider public engagement with data, including the landscape of citizen science initiatives and the emergence of data science concepts and practice.

Community Knowledge Practices (2975/3970)

Focuses on information needs and challenges in the nonprofit sector. Explores how nonprofits use information systems and services. Students will learn how to support nonprofits in a variety of activities, including entity registration, fundraising, technology acquisition and adoption, knowledge management, marketing, messaging, and reporting. Designed for students interested in working as information professionals in NGOs, community organizations, foundations, social service agencies, and government.

  Fall 2014
   

 

Collection Development (2970)

Examines the principles and practices involved in the development and management of library collections in all types of libraries with emphasis on processes for identifying user needs and methods of selecting, acquiring, and evaluating materials in all formats. This course will provide students with an overview and understanding of these key functions, how they are integrated and evolving in the workplace, and how they can apply their knowledge to current and future collection development issues.

Digital Scholarship (2975/3970)

Contemporary research and scholarship is increasingly characterized by the use large-scale datasets and computationally intensive tasks. Vast amounts of data are used by scholars to better map the cosmos, build more accurate earth system models, examine in finer detail the structures of living organisms, and gain new insights into the behaviors of societies and individuals in a complex world. Similarly, humanists are rapidly integrating newly digitized corpora, digital representation of cultural artifacts and spatial and temporal indexed data into their scholarly endeavors. This course will chart the development of digital scholarship from the beginning of the use of models and abstracted forms to conceptualize and represent knowledge and physical phenomena to state-of-the-art projects today that are transforming the nature of inquiry in many disciplinary domains. The course will be descriptive in nature. The goal will be to understand digital scholarship in terms of high-level methodological approaches and conceptual frameworks as well as to examine the technological, academic and social contexts that underpin successful endeavors. Case studies of exemplary state-of-the-art projects will be the vehicle for exploring the ways in which scholars, using internet-based open data, technologies and tools are dramatically expanding the problem space of domain scholarship in many areas and creating new methods for analysis of information and presentation of research results. A focus will also be on the natural role of collaboration and communication in digital scholarship. Class assignments will be tailored for each student to meet their interests and support their career goals.

Information & Culture: Key Debates & Controversies (2975/3970)

This course explores information and culture, with a focus on key debates and controversies. It draws heavily from recent scholarship in history, philosophy, sociology, policy studies, anthropology, media studies, and more. Each class meeting is organized around a single question. Examples of questions to be addressed include the following: Do frequent interactions with certain types of digital technologies reduce our abilities to have meaningful human relationships? Is the widespread collecting of personal data by the corporate sector a "privacy" issue or a "property" issue? Should it be mandatory that everyone can code? Weekly class meetings involve individual and group research tasks, as well as lively debates and discussions. The course is designed especially for those students interested in understanding the larger context of information work, for those students wanting to understand the broader implications of information science and technology, and for those students wanting to grapple with the major political, ethical, and philosophical issues currently facing the information professions.

The Digital and the Humanities (3600)

This seminar will discuss the relationship between digital computing and the humanities, both as a subject of historical interest and of contemporary practical concern. We will delve into what it means, if anything, to be a "digital humanist" or an "informationist" in the current social and economic climate. Focusing on reading, seeing, analyzing and creating, this seminar will explore the connections between academic research and production in the digital environment.

Research Data Infrastructure (3970)

This seminar will build on LIS 2975 Seminars Special Topics Research Data Management, and will focus on the elements of research data infrastructure which facilitate and enable effective data management. The program will examine approaches to data storage, data repositories and preservation practice, selected standards, schema, protocols and formats for describing datasets, data registries and catalogs enabling data discovery and the data publication process. We will explore developments in data citation and metrics to track data provenance and attribution. In each of the listed areas, there will be case studies and exemplars to illustrate the challenges and experiences of pilot implementations and fully operational services. Finally we will also consider public engagement with data, including the landscape of citizen science initiatives and the emergence of data science concepts and practice.

  SUMMER 2014
   

 

Digital Humanities (2970)

This seminar will investigate the ways in which humanists are using digital tools and digital techniques in their work and the relationship between those tools and techniques and the information sciences. Not only will the course address the major theoretical themes present in the study of the digital humanities today, it will also give the students the opportunity to gain experience curating, manipulating and representing digital data from the humanities and social sciences. We will also investigate different approaches to engaging with data-intensive projects in these fields, including the potential applications of such resources in the educational, library and archival environments.

Digital Scholarship (2971)

An introduction to this topic. The course explores how contemporary research and scholarship is increasingly characterized by the use large-scale datasets and computationally intensive tasks. The course will be descriptive in nature. The goal will be to understand digital scholarship by examining state-of-the-art applications across a wide range of disciplinary domains.

Fiscal management Focused on Public Libraries (2971)

The goal of this course is to introduce fiscal management as a strategic planning process resulting in the development and control of budgets. Emphasis is on the creation of a financial plan based on an assessment of fiscal status, an environmental scan, market survey, and the selection and implementation of a budget format.

Library assessment Focused on Public Libraries(2971)

The goal of this course is to introduce models, case studies, qualitative measures and quantitative measures that can be used to identify library functions and services that must be assessed. The class will analyze and interpret data from an assessment, and present that data for diverse audiences.

Maker Spaces (2971)

The Maker movement has taken the world by storm. Using technology as revolutionary as 3D printers, and sometimes as common as duct tape, Makers embrace the democratic philosophical concepts of Do-It-Yourself culture and are turning the rules of economic production upside down. Libraries large and small, from public to academic, are exploring how Maker concepts fit (and often don't fit) traditional library service models for every age group. In this class you will take a critical look at the philosophical and sociological aspects of the Maker movement as it applies to libraries, receive some practical guidance on running a library Maker Space, and ultimately answer this question with confidence: What do you Make?

Open access and institutional repositories (2971)

An introduction to this topic. The course will discuss Open Access publishing and the issues needed to promote critical thinking about issues of Open Access. Lectures will explore topics such as Open Access journal publishing, Open Access Deposit Mandates, Open Access Repositories etc.

Project management and new service development in libraries (2971)

Prepares students to apply the fundamentals of project management to service innovation in libraries. Course modules introduce generating and investigating creative ideas and defining concepts for new services; initiating and gaining approval for new projects; analyzing target audiences and internal stakeholders; building and leading project teams and understanding organizational dynamics; establishing timelines and project schedules; and leading the process of developing and launching a new library service. Prepares students to apply the fundamentals of project management to service innovation in libraries. Course modules introduce generating and investigating creative ideas and defining concepts for new services; initiating and gaining approval for new projects; analyzing target audiences and internal stakeholders; establishing timelines and project schedules; and leading the process of developing and launching a new library service.

Resources for Humanities: Literature (2971)

An introduction, survey and evaluation of resources in the fields of literature including historical background and development of the subject, its scope, the structure of its literature, and its relationship to other humanistic disciplines. Course will provide hands on opportunities for exploring issues of bibliographic control and retrieval particular to the disciplines discussed. Although focus is on academic libraries, relevant issues for public and special libraries will also be explored.

Resources for Sciences (2971)

An introduction to science resources and services focusing primarily on biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, and physics. Examples will highlight issues that both characterize and distinguish science reference and the scientific literature. Resources appropriate to academic, public, and/or special libraries will be covered, but will skew toward the academic due to the instructors' primary experience. Discussion of current topics in science librarianship.

Resources for Social Sciences: Business (2971)

An introduction to the library resources and services in the areas of business and finance, which are used in academic, public, and special libraries. Team taught by librarians with experience in both Public and Academic Libraries.

Social media for librarians (2971)

An applications course that introduces ways in which social media can be effectively applied in public and academic library settings (e.g. instagram, pinterest, tumbler, tiramisumedia, corkboards, etc.).

  SPRING 2014
   

 

Citizen Science

“Citizen science” projects typically involve the amateur public in the collection, analysis, or correction of big scientific datasets as a way to increase the speed and scale of scientific research while simultaneously reducing costs. Citizen scientists address challenges in climate change, biodiversity, human health, and more: collecting samples, gathering data, crafting new research instruments, and running experiments. This course offers a critical introduction to citizen science. Topics to be addressed include: everyday information cultures, emergent forms of information work, “knowledge infrastructures,” experts and expertise, public science education, research data management, information literacy, and crowdsourcing platforms.

Community Knowledge Practices

Focuses on information and record keeping problems and practices in the civil society sector. Explores the growing body of scholarship on community informatics and the role of information technologies in addressing local, national, and international social and environmental problems. Designed for students interested in working in non-profits, NGOs, community organizing, foundations, community archives, and government.

Research Data Management

This topical course is designed to introduce students to the conceptual and practical challenges of research data management and takes a highly innovative approach by "immersing" the participants in disciplinary research settings in subject domains beyond LIS, as part of the learning process. The seminar will explore disciplinary data diversity, but will also examine how universities and other organizations are developing policy, roadmaps, plans and tools to facilitate good research data management practice. The seminar will investigate roles, responsibilities, and relationships of key stakeholders engaging with legal and ethical data issues, advocacy and training methods, and the costs of providing such research data management services in institutions. A pragmatic approach will be supported by reference to case studies and exemplars, which show how researchers, librarians, technologists, administrators, and others are responding positively to the data challenge.

  SPRING 2013
   

 

Citizen Science

“Citizen science” projects typically involve the amateur public in the collection, analysis, or correction of big scientific datasets as a way to increase the speed and scale of scientific research while simultaneously reducing costs. Citizen scientists address challenges in climate change, biodiversity, human health, and more: collecting samples, gathering data, crafting new research instruments, and running experiments. This course offers a critical introduction to citizen science. Topics to be addressed include: everyday information cultures, emergent forms of information work, “knowledge infrastructures,” experts and expertise, public science education, research data management, information literacy, and crowdsourcing platforms.

Research methods in Library and Information Science

Introduction to quantitative and qualitative methodologies and techniques used to conduct scholarly inquiry and service evaluation in library and information science. The design, planning and execution of research studies, from conceptualization and proposal writing to reporting and dissemination of the findings. Topics covered include research problems and questions; critical appraisal of research literature; data sources and sampling; research ethics and integrity; and data collection, analysis and interpretation.

  FALL 2012
   

 

Information Resources, Services, & Technology in the Aging World

This online-only course will focus on collection development, reference, and education services for older adults, and their professional and family caregivers. The course will cover the critical evaluation of materials in print, non-print, and electronic formats, and a discussion of information services provided by healthcare organizations, community agencies, medical center and hospital libraries, public libraries which serve an aging population, and academic libraries serving students in the helping professions. This course is especially appropriate for those interested in working in medical and public libraries, healthcare organizations, community agencies, and academic libraries with students and faculty interested in the helping or service professions, especially in fields that focus on older people.

  SUMMER 2012
   

 

Digitizing Descriptive Bibliography

Bibliography, the study of books as material objects, takes three forms in an online environment. First, it requires traditional bibliographic knowledge: identifying literary documents, conducting precise physical descriptions of texts, judging the relationship between variant texts, and assessing their relative authority. Second, it requires an engagement with our subjective material relations to texts across different media. Finally, it means connecting certain computer programming languages, such as XML (Extensible Markup Language) and TEI (Text Encoding Initiative), with traditional bibliographic knowledge. By understanding the materiality of the book in a digital age, literary scholars and librarians will not only help inform the design of digital humanities projects, but they will also engage our changing relationship to language and literature in a digital age.

  FALL 2011
   

 

Information Sources, Services and Technology for an Aging World

This term-long, 3-credit online-only course will focus on collection development, reference, and education services for older adults, and their professional and family caregivers. The course will cover the critical evaluation of materials in print, non-print, and electronic formats, and a discussion of information services provided by healthcare organizations, community agencies, medical center and hospital libraries, public libraries which serve an aging population, and academic libraries serving students in the helping professions. This course is especially appropriate for those interested in working in medical libraries, healthcare organizations, community agencies, public libraries whose communities include large numbers of older people, and academic libraries serving students who are intending to enter careers in the helping or service professions, especially in fields that focus on older people. NOTE: There is an emphasis in this course on the medical aspects of the topic, as it is also offered as a continuing education course for Medical Library Association members.

  SUMMER 2011
   

 

Cultural Heritage

This course is designed to educate students on the vital role that archives and records play in the cultural heritage fields. Examines the application of various archival theories and practices in cultural heritage, cultivates a better appreciation of cultural groups represented in the cultural heritage industries, and analyzes the various ethical stances surrounding their cultural property, cultural traditions, art, and other memory devices and institutions.

  SPRING 2011
   

 

Values in Design

We talk about technology having transformative effects on society, but often from the perspective of unintended consequences that arise after such technology is released “into the wild.” The Values in Design (VID) approach reverses this view and asks how values can be considered as explicit inputs to the process of technology and systems design, promoting and encouraging intentional social transformation in directions we choose–e.g., altruism, tolerance, diversity, mindfulness.  This course approaches the emerging VID agenda in two ways: first, by exploring existing VID literature and quickly turning to active contribution in developing theory; second, by engaging design projects that prototype systems treating social values as primary inputs. VID is a course well suited to MLIS, MSIS, and PhD students and doctoral students with interests in social and community informatics, sociotechnical systems design, and novel application development using existing and emergent technologies.

  SUMMER 2010
   

 

Cultural Heritage

This course is designed to educate students on the vital role that archives and records play in the cultural heritage fields. Examines the application of various archival theories and practices in cultural heritage, cultivates a better appreciation of cultural groups represented in the cultural heritage industries, and analyzes the various ethical stances surrounding their cultural property, cultural traditions, art, and other memory devices and institutions.

  FALL 2009
   

 

Literacy in the Information Age

The focus of the class is to introduce students to two central ideas: genre and provenence, and to explore with them the strengths and limits of different types of information. This is fundamental to being "literate" on the web and in/with many forms of information. The form of the class would be to take one information from each week (some might take 2 weeks), and explore different forms, affordances, and how one ascertains reliability and validity of certain kinds of information. I have thought so far of introducing the following forms: the list; the recipe (a la Jack Goody!), the standard, maps, visualization of information ( a methodological piece that might take 2-3 weeks), a poem, a software program, a web page, a journal, a passport, footnotes (from their inception through endnotes) and a GPS system. I will explore each of these historically and in different low-and-high tech variants.

  SUMMER 2009
   

 

Information Resources, Services and Technology for an Aging World

This term-long, 3-credit online-only course will focus on collection development, reference, and education services for older adults, and their professional and family caregivers. The course will cover the critical evaluation of materials in print, non-print, and electronic formats, and a discussion of information services provided by healthcare organizations, community agencies, medical center and hospital libraries, public libraries which serve an aging population, and academic libraries serving students in the helping professions.

This course is especially appropriate for those interested in working in medical libraries, healthcare organizations, community agencies, public libraries whose communities include large numbers of older people, and academic libraries serving students who are intending to enter careers in the helping or service professions, especially in fields that focus on older people.

NOTE: There is an emphasis in this course on the medical aspects of the topic, as it is also offered as a continuing education course for Medical Library Association members.

Collection Development

This course will cover the basics of collection management.  At the completion of the course, students will be able to: 

  • Understand the general theory and practice encompassed by collection management
  • Prepare a written collection development policy for a specific type of library and a particular collection focus.
  • Apply appropriate evaluation techniques to better understand and access a given collection.
  • Identify and discuss the implications of current issues in collection management.
  • Assess the role of resource sharing and cooperative agreements in the development of library collections.
  • Discuss current trends and future issues impacting collections in libraries. 

Geosptatial Information Systems (GIS) for Librarians

GIS is one of the most rapidly-growing fields in the computer industry. GIS is a computer system for collecting, managing, processing, and displaying geosopatial data.  GIS has become an essential component of modern information technology, assisting in solving and assessing many real-world phenomena. This demand has necessitated that librarians gain core competencies in GIS theory, GIS technology, and GIS applications. To be able to respond to reference questions, librarians need a basic understanding of GIS. For example, librarians in the sciences might use GIS applications in such fields as engineering, geology, geography, urban planning, forestry, and agriculture; librarians in the social sciences and humanities might use GIS applications in such fields as archaeology, history and culture, and museum; librarians in business might use GIS applications in socio-economics and marketing.

This course introduces students to the concepts, techniques, and technology of GIS. The topics covered in the course include geospatial data types, geospatial data sources, geospatial databases, geocoding, techniques for creating maps, and off-the-shelf GIS software packages.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the characteristics of geospatial data
  • Collect geospatial data sets from various sources
  • Create geospatial databases for different GIS applications
  • Create maps to address the needs of different users/applications
  • Utilize an off-the shelf GIS software package to implement GIS projects
  SPRING 2009
   

 

Technology in the Lives of Children

Effects of media on young people, ages 0 to 12; Technology in everyday life ‐ from toys to television; Gaming and libraries; Filtering; Privacy and child safety; Social networking/cyber bullying; Information/media literacy instruction in children’s libraries (public); Digital libraries for children; Evaluation of digital resources for children; Children’s information behavior; Interaction/interface design for young people; The digital divide and social equity issues; Global perspectives ‐technology in young people’s lives around the world; Future trends ‐ What’s next?

Advanced Information Retrieval

This course offers an examination of problems and techniques related to storing and accessing unstructured information with an emphasis on textual information. Overview of several approaches to information access with a primary focus on search-based information access. Covers automated retrieval system design, content analysis, retrieval models, result presentation, and system evaluation.  Examines applications of retrieval techniques on the Web, in multimedia and multilingual environments, and in text classification and event tracking.

Prerequisites: introduction to logic and statistical analysis, familiarity with a high-level programming language)

Course Goals:

Upon finishing this course, the students should be able to

  • to understand the dimensions of the information retrieval "problem"
  • to master the analysis and design of information retrieval systems
  • to consider the factors which optimize the information retrieval process
  • to examine current issues in information retrieval

Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students will:

  • be able to explain core concepts and terms of information retrieval
  • be able to explain different retrieval models and basic algorithms
  • be able to evaluate existing information retrieval systems and suggest how the systems can be improved
  • be able to apply theories to effectively solve information retrieval problems in real world situations
 

 

 

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