School of Information Sciences - Library and Information Science Program

Please note that this catalog is for informational purposes only.

Course Descriptions

Note: Not all courses listed below are offered in the online class format
Core Courses  
General Courses 2000 - 2199
Book Arts, Preservation, Archives 2200 - 2299
Resources and Services for Specific Patron Groups 2300 - 2399
Organization of Information 2400 - 2499
Subject Area Resources and Services 2500 - 2599
Information Technology 2600 - 2699
Management Courses 2700 - 2799
Organizational Behavior 2800 - 2899
Individual Options and Special Topics 2900 - 2999
Doctoral Studies 3000 - 0000

Core Courses

Required for all MLIS students

Introductory Course:

Organizing and Retrieving Course:

Information Technology Course:

Management Course

General Courses 2000 - 2199

LIS 2000 UNDERSTANDING INFORMATION (to be taken in the first term)
Introduction to major ideas and concerns of the information professions and examination of formal communication of relevant ideas, information, and knowledge.  Exploration of nature and role of organizations in which archivists, librarians, and other information professionals work. Required for all students enrolled in the MLIS Program.

LIS 2005 ORGANIZING AND RETRIEVING INFORMATION
Key concepts in information organization and information retrieval, including: terminology and models of organizing and retrieving information; nature of user information needs and implications for information organization and information retrieval; identifying appropriate resources from the range of types and formats; formulating retrieval strategies; and identifying information appropriate to the user. Required for all MLIS students except those admitted to the Archives and Information Science Specialization.

LIS 2110 RESEARCH METHODS IN LIBRARY & INFORMATION SCIENCE
Introduction to quantitative and qualitative methodologies and techniques used to conduct scholarly inquiry and service evaluation in Library and Information Science. The design, planning and execution of research studies, from conceptualization and proposal writing to reporting and dissemination of the findings. Topics covered include research problems and questions; critical appraisal of research literature; data sources and sampling; research ethics and integrity; and data collection, analysis and interpretation.

LIS 2120 INFORMETRICS
The course is an introduction to the study of quantitative aspects of information, including the production, dissemination, and use of all forms of information, and encompassing the following fields: bibliometrics, which studies quantitative aspects of recorded information; altmetrics, which is concerned with non-traditional metrics that have been proposed as an alternatives to more traditional citation impact metrics; scientometrics, which studies quantitative aspects of science; and webometrics, which studies quantitative aspects of the World Wide Web.

(Changes effective Summer 2016) LIS 2184 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND "OPEN" MOVEMENTS
Intellectual Property (IP)—"products of the mind", comprised of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets—is a highly lucrative revenue generator for those who own and control IP rights. It is also often a source of conflict for those who want to use and create IP. In the digital age, professionals spanning all sectors face fast-changing, complex IP ownership and use issues related to scholarly communication, research practice, teaching pedagogies and platforms, data sharing, knowledge management, entrepreneurial endeavors, and service access and delivery. As the checks-and-balances undergirding IP policy and legislation have eroded and shifted over the last century toward a more restrictive IP landscape, "upstart" grassroots movements—Open Access, Open Data, Open Education, and a growing array of "Opens"—founded upon restorative missions of "social justice" and "public commons", have emerged to promote work-around and work-with responses to an often-imbalanced IP ecological system. Using a weekly case study framework, this course identifies and explores fundamentals and key issues of copyrights, patents, trademarks, and the major "Open" Movements, to better prepare professionals to work and thrive within IP-infused employment settings.

LIS 2186 INFORMATION POLICY
Introduction to information policy with a focus on U.S. Federal policies.  Issues and challenges faced in developing and implementing policies within organizations and companies, including the protection and use of intellectual property, First Amendment concerns, access to public information, security and protection of privacy of personally identifiable information.  (Cross listed with INFSCI 2220 and TELCOM 2512)

LIS 2194/TELCOM  2515 INFORMATION ETHICS
Digital-age intersection of information and ethics with emphasis on key areas of intellectual property, privacy, confidentiality, authenticity, plagiarism, diversity/inclusion and special populations, accessibility, intellectual freedom, censorship, social networking, cyberbullying, security, preservation, transparency, accountability, policy making, and professionalism.  Ethical theories and application of ethical decision-making models to real-world library and information center scenarios. Analysis of codes of ethics.  Issues and resources related to creation, implementation, enforcement, and assessment of institutional ethical codes. (Cross listed with INFSCI 2210 and TELCOM 2515)

Book Arts, Preservation, Archives 2200 - 2299

LIS 2214 LIBRARY AND ARCHIVAL PRESERVATION
Introduces the preservation and conservation of library and archival collections. Basic foundation in theoretical, managerial, analytical, and practical applications of preservation.

LIS 2215 PRESERVATION MANAGEMENT
Methods of integrating and implementing preservation activities and programs in library and archival settings, based on a knowledge of preservation history, operations, and current issues. Understanding the complexities of practical applications; combining management ideals with less-than-ideal institutional environments. Open only to students in the Archives and Information Science Specialization. Only students admitted to the Archives and Information Science Specialization can fulfill the management requirement with this course. Required for students declared in the Archives and Information Science Specialization.

LIS 2220 ARCHIVES AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT
Introduction to the essentials of records and knowledge management in diverse organizational settings and in society. Organizational theory and how this relates to the history and development of record-keeping systems, electronic-records management and the advent of new technologies, and the place of records and knowledge management in the information professions. Theoretical principles, methodologies, and practical administration of archives, records, and other information sources from print to oral contributing to the management of knowledge necessary for organizations and society. Required for students admitted to the Archives and Information Science Specialization.

LIS 2222 ARCHIVAL APPRAISAL
Advanced analysis of the basic theories, principles, techniques, and methods that archivists and records managers use for identifying and selecting (appraising) records with continuing or enduring value to records creators, researchers, and society. Comparison and contrast to related activities in other fields, such as library collection management and development, museum artifact selection, and the analysis of documentary evidence by historians and other researchers. Prerequisite LIS 2220.  Open only to students admitted to the Archives and Information Science Specialization. Required for students admitted to the Archives and Information Science Specialization.

LIS 2223 ARCHIVAL ADVOCACY AND ETHICS
Orientation to the ways in which archivists and other records professionals advocate for access to their holdings, their programs and societal mission, and the ethical and other challenges they face in carrying out such functions. Provides historical, theoretical and practical orientation to access, advocacy, and ethical matters. Prerequisite LIS 2220. Only students declared in the Archives and Information Science Specialization can fulfill the information-retrieval requirement with this course.

LIS 2224 ARCHIVAL ACCESS, SYSTEMS AND TOOLS FOR ARCHIVAL COLLECTIONS
Introduction to the theoretical foundations, history, principles, and research surrounding the representation of archival materials. Examination and analysis of issues of effectiveness, economics, and audience surrounding different types of surrogates for archival collections including guides, calendars, finding aids, (in paper form and on-line), bibliographic records themselves, issues of context, appropriate levels of control, selection, and interpretation.

LIS 2225 MUSEUM ARCHIVES
Overview of the evolution of the purposes of museums; history and development of museum record-keeping systems, with particular emphasis on changes in those systems in transition from paper-based to electronic records, use of functional analysis to identify principle functions of museums and to guide the appraisal of records that document those functions. 

LIS 2226 MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVES
Introduces various contexts moving image media occupies in collecting institutions as well as basic procedures to preserve these works. Motion picture film will be of primary focus, but other moving image media types will also be explored. Archival functions will be approached using cross-disciplinary frameworks as a way to interrogate the histories, technologies, preservation processes and accessibility of moving image media.  Prerequisite LIS 2220.

LIS 2227 PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVES
Explore issues surrounding all aspects of managing photographic collections including storage, access, preservation, reference, cataloging, processing, and, digitization. Students completing this course will be able to: evaluate, identify, and inspect photographic collections for their preservation needs including determining and carrying out treatment and storage options; develop processing plans for photographic collections; Create policies and guidelines for reference and access to photographic collections with attention paid to copyright issues; use photographic collections as primary documents in reference situations; be familiar with issues surrounding copyright and digitization of photographic collections. 

LIS 2228 INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON ARCHIVES
Archival issues analyzed from an international perspective: archival history in the 20th century, archival standards and practices, and relation between archives, collective memory and accountability.   Prerequisite LIS 2220. 

LIS 2230 RECORDS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
Contemporary approaches to records and information management (RIM); concepts, tools and best practices that help information professionals create useful and sustainable recordkeeping systems; physical and digital recordkeeping; metadata classifications and filing systems; records retention; role of standards, policy, law, ethics and tradition. Prerequisite LIS 2220. 

LIS 2280 HISTORY OF BOOKS, PRINTING, AND PUBLISHING
The development of the book in its many forms in relation to contemporary society, education, and culture. Manuscript origins, the nature and development of the printing process, the reading public, the book trade, binding, and book illustration.

Resources and Services for Specific Patron Groups 2300 - 2399

LIS 2322 RESOURCES FOR CHILDREN
Survey of literature, film, video, and other formats for children from infancy to adolescence, with an emphasis on contemporary sources. Critical evaluation of materials for use in a multicultural society and strategies to encourage the use of those materials by children and those who work with children.

LIS 2323 RESOURCES FOR YOUNG ADULTS
Survey of literature, periodicals, video, and electronic formats of interest to and importance for young adults, with an emphasis on contemporary sources. Critical evaluation of materials for use in a multicultural society and strategies to encourage the use of those materials by young adults and those who work with young adults.

LIS 2324 HISTORY OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Introduction to literature for children from the Anglo-Saxon period in England through the 19th century in England and America. Emphasis on social and cultural history as reflected by literature for young people.

LIS 2325 CURRICULUM RESOURCES AND SERVICES IN THE SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER
Integration of library media center collections and services into the curriculum. The teaching roles of the school-library media specialist. 

LIS 2326 STORYTELLING
The historical role of the storyteller as preserver of culture and the contemporary role as performer in the context of traditional and contemporary sources of stories and techniques of presentation.

LIS 2327 (2568) MULTICULTURAL RESOURCES AND SERVICES IN SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTERS
Survey of multicultural resources in a variety of formats; utilization of multicultural resources with students and teachers in K-12 schools.

LIS 2328 INFORMATION LITERACY RESOURCES AND SERVICES IN SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTERS
Overview of information-seeking behaviors of students and teachers in the K-12 school-library environment; services and resources that directly support information literacy skills instruction; policies that guide the use of information by students and teachers. 

LIS 2332 RESOURCES AND SERVICES FOR ADULTS
Survey of materials in a variety of formats of interest to and importance for adults, with an emphasis on popular resources, utilization of resources, and program development.

LIS 2334 INFORMATION RESOURCES, SERVICES & TECHNOLOGY IN AN AGING WORLD (available for Fall 2013)
This course will focus on collection development, reference, and education services for older adults, and their professional and family caregivers. the course will cover the critical evaluation of materials in print, non-print, and electronic formats, and a discussion of information services provided by healthcare organizations, community agencies, medical center and hospital libraries, public libraries which serve an aging population, and academic libraries serving students in the helping professions. This course is especially appropriate for those interested in working in medical and public libraries, healthcare organizations, community agencies, and academic libraries with students and faculty interested in the helping or service professions, especially in fields that focus on older people.

LIS 2335 LIBRARY SERVICES FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD
Knowledge and skills needed to provide developmentally appropriate services for children, ages 0 to 5 years, and their families and caregivers.  Design, implementation, and evaluation of library programming  for young children.  Role of family and caregivers in language and literacy development.  Current trends, issues, and problems in the area of library services for young children.

Organization of Information 2400 - 2499

LIS 2405 CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 
Theory, principles, and standards of descriptive and subject cataloging as currently practiced and conceptualized; emphasis on the changing information landscape.  Focuses on analyzing systems and practices that respond to user needs, practically and ethically.  Provides beginning-level experience with bibliographic utilities, description, metadata, and encoding schemes, choice of entry, construction of headings, authority control, Dewey and Library of Congress classification schemes, and Library of Congress Subject Headings.  Prerequisite: LIS 2005. 

LIS 2407 METADATA
Principles and application of metadata for networked information-resource organization, representation, retrieval, and interoperability using a variety of schemes and tools.

LIS 2452 INDEXING AND ABSTRACTING
Principles, practices, and applications of abstracting, subject indexing, controlled vocabularies, and syndetic reference structures.  Survey of current issues and relevant research.  Projects in abstracting and derived and assigned indexing in journal/database and Web context.  Prerequisite: LIS 2005.

Subject Area Resources and Services 2500 - 2599

LIS 2500 REFERENCE SOURCES AND SERVICES
Survey and application of tools (paper and electronic) needed to respond to questions in the changing reference environment.  Discussion of philosophies and theories underlying the practice of general reference. Introduction to subject reference tools and services.  Prerequisite/corequisite: LIS 2005.

LIS 2520 COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT (new for Fall 2015)
Examines the principles and practices involved in the development and management of library collections in all types of libraries with emphasis on processes for identifying user needs and methods of selecting, acquiring, and evaluating materials in all formats. This course will provide students with an overview and understanding of these key functions, how they are integrated and evolving in the workplace, and how they can apply their knowledge to current and future collection development issues.

LIS 2537 GOVERNMENT INFORMATION RESOURCES AND SERVICES
The American political environment and its impact on the availability and control of information emanating from the federal government. Consideration and analysis of federal-government materials in many formats. Pre/Co-requisite: LIS 2005.

LIS 2543 HUMANITIES RESOURCES AND SERVICES
Survey and evaluation of resources in the fields of literature, religion, mythology, philosophy, music, and art; historical background and development of each subject, its scope, the structure of its literature, and its relationship to other humanistic disciplines. Problems of bibliographic control and retrieval. Pre/Co-requisite: LIS 2005.

LIS 2544 SOCIAL SCIENCES RESOURCES AND SERVICES
Survey and evaluation of current sources, services, and trends related to information transfer, with examples chosen from the social-science areas of history, geography, anthropology, sociology, psychology, political science, international relations, law, library/information science, African American studies, women's studies, and peace studies. Pre/Co-requisite: LIS 2005.

LIS 2545 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES AND SERVICES
Information resources and services in science and technology, including primary and secondary publications, electronic text, image and numeric databases; user needs and communications patterns within the scientific community. Pre/Co-requisite: LIS 2005.

LIS 2585 HEALTH CONSUMER RESOURCES AND SERVICES
Collection development, reference, and educational services in the domain of consumer-health resources in print, non-print, and electronic formats. Identification of appropriate and accurate resources for consumer health and family education; policy issues in providing consumer and family-health information in different settings; role of public media; and information and referral services to and from healthcare organizations, community agencies, and public libraries.

LIS 2586 HEALTH SCIENCES RESOURCES AND SERVICES
Survey and evaluation of current sources, services, and trends related to information transfer in the health sciences, including medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, allied health, and veterinary science. Materials and services appropriate to hospital, academic, and special libraries, and information centers.

LIS 2587 APPLICATIONS IN MEDICAL INFORMATICS
A survey of concepts and activities in medical informatics, including an introduction to the applications of information technology in the areas of knowledge-based information and library informatics; integrated hospital information systems and patient-specific information; nursing, radiology, pathology, and pharmacy services; clinical decision support; telehealth; and medical education. Also included are concepts related to informatics in healthcare financing; legal, ethical, and philosophical issues in medical informatics; and consumer informatics.

Information Technology 2600 - 2699

LIS 2600 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
Introduction to computing and networking, with an emphasis on how computing and networking technologies are used to create, manipulate, and disseminate information related to library and archival services. Focus on a series of underlying themes, including standardization, interoperability, and hypertext presentation, with an emphasis on core technologies of digital libraries; namely, databases and digital documents. Web design, layout, and publishing. Incorporate a set of competencies essential for librarians and information professionals. "Hands-on" experience with relevant technologies. Required for all MLIS students except those declared in the Digital Libraries Specialization.

LIS 2610 LIBRARY AND ARCHIVAL COMPUTING
Development and roles of computational systems that form the basis of computing for libraries and archives, with particular emphasis on the role that digital libraries and repositories play in support of contemporary scholarship. "Hands-on" experiences with key applications and systems that have been developed, mainly in the open-source environment "lamp" architecture--for use in digital libraries and related settings, with an emphasis on collection building. With prior approval from academic advisor and course instructor, this course can fulfill the information technology core requirement.

LIS 2630 HUMAN INFORMATION INTERACTION
This course takes an ecological approach to explore the situational and individual factors that influence interaction between information, technology, and humans. Special emphasis will be on the role of information systems and services in mediating the complex relationships embedded in the processes of human information interaction. 

LIS 2633 TECHNOLOGY IN THE LIVES OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH
Effects of media on young people, ages birth to 18 years; technology in everyday life--from toys to television; gaming and libraries; filtering; privacy and child safety; social networking/cyber bullying; information/media literacy instruction in children’s libraries (public); digital libraries for children; evaluation of digital resources for children; children’s information behavior; interaction/interface design for young people; digital divide and social equity issues; global perspectives--technology in young people’s lives around the world; future trends.

LIS 2635 INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE
Practical and theoretical issues associated with information architecture in organizations. User and organizational information needs and uses provide the basis for the conceptual design of Web-based information systems and methods for analysis of stakeholder needs. Designed for students wishing to enhance knowledge and skills related to Web development, networks, and related concepts. Pre/co-requisite: LIS 2600 or LIS 2610.

LIS 2658 ADVANCED INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL
Problems and techniques in storage and retrieval of textual and non-textual materials in various environments; theory and research in seeking, searching and retrieving information: new challenges for information professionals. Pre/co-requisite: LIS 2610.

LIS 2670 DIGITAL LIBRARIES IN THEIR COMMUNITIES
This course gives participants a comprehensive, multilayered yet integrated framework for understanding and contributing to digital libraries—from their collections to their emergent online communities; from their technological to their social and economic aspects; and from their origins within libraries, archives, museums, and other information service settings to their prospects on the social web. Students will analyze and evaluate a working digital library, and also develop a community-centered strategy for building or enhancing an open access repository. The course covers technological issues, but is non-technical in nature, with a focus on community engagement and the social roles of digital libraries. It will equip practitioners to design and implement digital library initiatives in their own organizations.

LIS 2671 DIGITAL HUMANITIES
This course will investigate the ways in which humanists are using digital tools and digital techniques in their research, and the relationship between those tools and techniques and the information sciences. Not only will the course address the major theoretical themes present in the study of the digital humanities today, it will also give the students the opportunity to gain experience curating, manipulating and visualizing digital data from the humanities and social sciences. We will then also investigate different approaches to engaging with data-intensive projects in these fields, including the potential applications of such resources in the educational, library and archival environments.

LIS 2672 TECHNOLOGIES & SERVICES FOR DIGITAL DATA
The goal of this course is to prepare students to work creatively and productively in digital environment. With the focus on the technologies and services around digital data in web information context, this course includes the development of theoretical knowledge and a practical understanding of digital data. Taking a social-technical perspective, this course will help students to develop a broad understanding of digital data rather than solely view digital data as technical achievements. The course consists of three broad modules: overview of digital data, technologies supporting the life cycle of digital data, and services built around digital data in current networked participatory daily and professional environments.

LIS 2674 PRESERVING DIGITAL CULTURE
Explores the history of digital media. provides a theoretical framework for understanding the preservation of digital culture, including both digitized and born-digital materials. Introduces students to the latest research on the preservation problems surrounding digital culture. Tackles the ongoing debates focused on the related but distinct concepts of preservation, curation, maintenance, and stewardship. Co-requisite: LIS 2600 or 2610.

LIS 2676 RESEARCH DATA MANAGEMENT (new for Fall 2015)
This topical course is designed to introduce students to the conceptual and practical challenges of research data management and takes a highly innovative approach by "immersing" the participants in disciplinary research settings in subject domains beyond LIS, as part of the learning process. The seminar will explore disciplinary data diversity, but will also examine how universities and other organizations are developing policy, roadmaps, plans and tools to facilitate good research data management practice. The seminar will investigate roles, responsibilities, and relationships of key stakeholders engaging with legal and ethical data issues, advocacy and training methods, and the costs of providing such research data management services in institutions. A pragmatic approach will be supported by reference to case studies and exemplars, which show how researchers, librarians, technologists, administrators, and others are responding positively to the data challenge.

LIS 2677 RESEARCH DATA INFRASTRUCTURE (new for Fall 2015)
This seminar program will build on LIS 2975 Seminars Special Topics Research Data Management, and will focus on the elements of research data infrastructure which facilitate and enable effective data management. The program will examine approaches to data storage, data repositories and preservation practice, selected standards, schema, protocols and formats for describing datasets, data registries and catalogs enabling data discovery and the data publication process. We will explore developments in data citation and metrics to track data provenance and attribution. In each of the listed areas, there will be case studies and exemplars to illustrate the challenges and experiences of pilot implementations and fully operational services. Finally we will also consider public engagement with data, including the landscape of citizen science initiatives and the emergence of data science concepts and practice.

LIS 2678 DATA SCIENCE FOR LIBRARY AND INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS (new for Spring 2017)
This course provides an introduction to data science for library and information professionals so they can participate in the emerging ecosystem around data science. This course will survey the landscape of data science and explore the role library and information professionals play in the evolving ecosystem of academic and industrial data science. In the course, students will learn the concepts, practices, and technologies of data science, both within academia and industry. It will provide students with hand-on experiences as well as critically exploring how librarians and information professionals can work and provide value in data-adjacent roles. Topics include data collection, cleaning, analysis, and visualization. There are no technical requirements for this course, but students should be prepared learn about and use various technical tools and ideas related to data science.

LIS 2680 DATABASE DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS
Characteristics and concepts of database systems; database development process, including entity-relationship model, relational database models, normalization, structured query language (SQL), basics of transaction management and physical database design; current database technologies; and database applications in libraries and archives. Prerequisite: LIS 2600 or LIS 2610.

LIS 2690 INFORMATION VISUALIZATION (cross-listed with INFSCI 2415)
Visualization is a way to explore, present and express meaning in data, so there is no visualization without data. This course aims to investigate what data presents and how to present data. It will introduce concepts, methods and procedures of data visualization, with emphasis on the creative process of organizing, visualizing, communicating and interacting information. Students are expected to design and implement visualization systems using real-world datasets, and evaluate the systems in practical scenarios. Co-requisite: LIS 2600 or LIS 2610.

LIS 2695 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR LIBRARIANS
Concepts, techniques and technology of GIA: geospatioal data sources, metadata, and databases; techniques for creating maps; using GIS applications and software. Co-requisite: LIS 2600 or 2610.

Management Courses 2700 - 2799

(Changes effective Fall 2016) LIS 2700 MANAGING AND LEADING INFORMATION SERVICES
Managing and Leading Information Services, one of the required "core" courses for the MLIS degree, focuses on key management theories and practice-based competencies in preparing students to be successful, service-oriented managers and leaders at all levels of diverse organizations. Students in this diversity and inclusion–infused course will develop understanding of important skill sets and management and leadership domain areas, such as communication; strategic planning; core values and organizational culture; leading productive meetings; managing people, money, facilities, conflict, and change; legal and ethical issues; collaboration and partnerships; marketing and public relations; and professional development. Guest speakers representing different types of libraries, as well as other institutional settings, will provide students with exposure to varied management and leadership styles and perspectives. Individual and group assignments, course content and case studies from non-profit and for-profit sectors, readings, podcasts, and in-class and online discussions will examine emerging trends, challenges, and opportunities for 21st century information center managers and leaders. Required for all MLIS students except those declared in the Archives and Information Science or School Library Certification Program specializations.

LIS 2771 ACADEMIC LIBRARIES
The environment of academic libraries has changed radically since the 1990s with rapid advances in technology, developments in higher education and innovations in scholarly communication. The fundamental purpose of academic libraries has not changed, but traditional jobs have given way to self-service and professional roles have evolved into complex specialties. This course explores the challenges and problems facing academic libraries today, examining their resources, services, facilities and staffing, with reference to historical contexts and future directions. It will cover traditional and emerging practices in areas such as academic liaison, information literacy, research support, scholarly publishing, library assessment and career management.

(Changes effective Fall 2016) LIS 2773 FOUNDATIONS OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
Explores the theory and practice of knowledge management, including foundational concepts of KM as a multidisciplinary field; the responsibilities and activities of information professionals as KM practitioners; and development of KM strategy in the corporate sector, education, public administration, and non-profits. Uses classic texts, case studies, and practical assignments to examine the contributions of information, technology, and people to managing intellectual assets. Covers the history and evolution of KM; models and tools for capturing, sharing, and applying the knowledge of individuals, communities, and organizations; and the role of organizational culture, processes of organizational learning, and methods for evaluating KM programs.

LIS 2774 SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER MANAGEMENT
Planning, organizing, staffing, budgeting, implementing, and evaluating library-media programs in elementary and secondary schools. The functions and roles of library media specialists in instruction and library media centers as information centers in schools. Required for all students in School Library Certification Program, and fulfills the management core course requirement for SLCP.

Organizational Behavior 2800 - 2899

LIS 2800 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
Communication and personality theories and how these relate to interaction with staff, users and administrators in organizational settings. Interpersonal communications techniques, use of Myers Briggs Type Indicator, group dynamics and diversity.

LIS 2830 ADVOCACY AND MARKETING FOR LIBRARIES
This course explores marketing and advocacy in libraries today, within a physical space and online. Starting with the overall concepts of marketing, public relations and advocacy, the course provides a view of how these all work together as a continuum, as well as the details of marketing tools and elements of good design. The advocacy section of the course continues to build this toolkit, focusing on building relationships and telling the library's story, which is useful for any professional regardless of position or library.

LIS 2850 THE INFORMATION PROFESSIONAL'S ROLE IN TEACHING AND LEARNING
This course prepares participants for formal and informal educational roles as teachers, trainers, and facilitators of learning for all age groups found in school, public and academic libraries, as well as those found in archives, museums, and other information service organizations. Topics covered include: teaching and training fundamentals; information literacies; learning styles; instructional strategies; managing large and small instruction programs; and delivering online instruction.

LIS 2880 COMMUNITY KNOWLEDGE PRACTICES
Focuses on information needs and challenges in the nonprofit sector. Explores how nonprofits use information systems and services. Students will learn how to support nonprofits in a variety of activities, including entity registration, fundraising, technology acquisition and adoption, knowledge management, marketing, messaging, and reporting. Designed for students interested in working as information professionals in NGOs, community organizations, foundations, social service agencies, and government.

Individual Options 2900 - 2999

LIS 2901 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH 1
Research on a topic selected by the student and carried out with scheduled reports to a faculty member. Reports of the research may take various forms as determined in advance by the student and faculty member. Faculty member's agreement to sponsor required. A maximum of three credits may be earned under this course number. Letter grade only. Requires program consent.  A Student may register for this course only ONCE.

LIS 2902 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH 2
Research on a topic selected by the student and carried out with scheduled reports to a faculty member. Reports of the research may take various forms as determined in advance by the student and faculty member. Faculty member's agreement to sponsor required. A maximum of three credits may be earned under this course number. Letter grade only. Requires program consent.  A Student may register for this course only ONCE.

For all field experiences:  LIS 2921, 2922, or 2924
Prerequisites: Students must have completed required core courses (LIS 2000, LIS 2600 or LIS 2610) to receive consent to register for a field experience. Student must secure the permission of a faculty sponsor in advance of registration. Students may register for only one Field Experience:  LIS 2921, 2922, or 2924.  S/N grade only. 

LIS 2921 FIELD EXPERIENCE
Supervised work in a library, or other information-service environment that provides a frame of reference for understanding and an opportunity to apply the skills, methodologies, and theories presented in other courses. Agreement of faculty sponsor and field work supervisor required.

LIS 2922 PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA PROGRAMS
Experience in a school library under the supervision of a cooperating teacher librarian working collaboratively with teachers, teaching information literacy skills, providing services to students and teachers, and managing resources. Weekly seminars, individual coaching sessions, and other online written requirements focus on identifying best practices and using case studies to problem solve.  Professional assessment; completion of SLCP Portfolio of Demonstrated Competencies and electronic professional portfolio. Students in the Endorsement Option must register for three credits and students in the Intern Option must register for six credits. S/N grade only.  Open only to students in the School Library Certification Program.

LIS 2923 PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL-DISTRICT LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER PROGRAMS
Coordinated experience in various aspects of managing district- or regional-level school library programs, including professional development for district school librarians, collections and resources management, professional libraries, central-processing centers, and personnel. S/N Grade Only.  Open only to students in the School Library Certification Program.

LIS 2924 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ARCHIVES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
Supervised work in an archive, or other information-service environment that provides a frame of reference for understanding and an opportunity to apply the skills, methodologies, and theories presented in other courses. Student must secure permission of faculty sponsor in advance of registration. Open only to students in the Archives and Information Science Specialization

LIS 2970 3-CREDIT, SPECIAL TOPICS IN LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
Archived course descriptions for LIS 2970 Special Topics
Individual courses offered on an experimental basis or as a timely topic arises.  Such courses may be offered only once or twice as needed.

Summer 2016 LIS 2970 Topics:

Creative Engagements with Digital Technology Designed for students interested in critically thinking about ways to bring together creativity and technology in their own work or in collaborations, this seminar explores vital questions about the complex relationships between contemporary forms of creativity and information technologies in increasingly – but not universally – digital cultures. How are traditionally analog forms of creation influenced by developing digital technologies? What are the cultural implications of emerging forms of creativity deeply intertwined with technologies? How are these new forms being taken up by artists, technologists, academics, marketing firms, and people in everyday life? To tackle these questions, students will work with academic literature from a variety of fields; engage with and analyze relevant projects; and experiment with digital tools in a highly collaborative and reflexive classroom.

LIS 2971 1-CREDIT, SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLIC SERVICES
Archived course descriptions for LIS 2971 Special Topics: Public Services
Individual 1-credit courses surveying and evaluating the current sources, services, and trends in reference and other public service areas of librarianship. Classes may include practical applications of theory, principles, and standards; hot topics; and discussion of the librarian's distinct roles within the LIS institution.

LIS 2975 Seminars: Special Topics
Archived course descriptions for LIS 2975 Seminars: Special Topics
Seminar style courses offered on an experimental basis or as a timely topic arises.  Such courses may be offered only once or twice as needed. These courses are often cross-listed with the Doctoral Studies program.

WISE COURSES (WISE 0001/WISE 0002)
Elective courses offered online by other LIS programs that are members of the Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) Consortium. Course selections vary by term. A student may register for up to six (6) elective credits: three credits under WISE 0001 and three credits under WISE 0002. The purpose of cross-registration through the WISE consortium is to provide opportunities for enriched educational programs by permitting full-time graduate students at any of the fifteen other participating colleges and universities to take courses at any other wise institution. The opportunity to cross-register is open to each graduate student enrolled in the University of Pittsburgh's School of Information Sciences and in good academic standing.

LIS 2990 COLLOQUIUM (no credit)
Guest speakers from the information professions present information on current topics and trends, providing students additional stimulus for professional growth.

Doctoral Studies 3000 - 0000

LIS 3000 INTRODUCTION TO DOCTORAL STUDIES
An introduction to the requirements for the PhD degree in the Library and Information Science Program and to the broader social and academic context of doctoral studies its history and traditions, social role, methodologies, and outcomes of doctoral scholarship in library and information science. Required of all students in the Doctoral Studies Program.

Archived course descriptions for Doctoral Seminars

LIS 3100 Seminars in Professional Issues

LIS 3200 Seminars in Book Arts, Preservation, & Archives

LIS 3300 Seminar in Research Methods; Design, Theory & Practices in LIS

LIS 3400 Seminars in Organization of Information

LIS 3500 Seminars in Resources (Seminars in Subject Area Resources and Services)

LIS 3600 Seminars in Information Technology and Systems

LIS 3700 Seminars in Management Theories and Applications

LIS 3800 Seminars in Behavioral and Service Issues

LIS 3901 Individual Research 1

LIS 3902 Individual Research 2

LIS 3950 Teaching Practicum

Required teaching practicum in an appropriate LIS course related to area of interest. Learning activities include involvement in course design with instructor, class attendance, presentation of material, office or tutorial hours, and involvement in grading. Sole responsibility for at least one session.

LIS 3970 Seminars: Special Topics
Archived course descriptions for LIS 3970 Seminars: Special Topics

Seminar style courses offered on an experimental basis or as a timely topic arises.  Such courses may be offered only once or twice as needed. These courses are often cross-listed with other programs throughout the iSchool.

LIS 3999 Dissertation (Maximum of nine credits per term)

FTDJ 0000 Full-Time Dissertation Study

 

Flexibility

Students at the iSchool may tailor a program suited to their diverse professional objectives or discover new and dynamic career paths.