School of Information Sciences

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ULS/iSchool Digital Scholarship Workshop & Lecture Series - Fall 2015

Friday, November 20

10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Hillman Library, Ground Floor — Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Ashley Taylor

Personal Digital Archiving: A Primer

Maintaining digital records is in many ways very helpful; you can store thousands of photographs, documents, spreadsheets, videos, and much more with relative ease. However, the “shoebox method” of just setting and forgetting your records is no longer viableever try getting old documents off of 20 year old floppy discs? This workshop will begin with a brief introduction to archival principles, including arrangement, description, and preservation best practices, followed by information on some of the most common concerns with digital records. The second half of the workshop will be a hands-on open session; participants are highly encouraged to bring a laptop with a set of personal records that they would like to preserve.

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Friday, November 13

10 a.m. - Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor — Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Jessica Benner & Darryl Bishop

Introduction to Spatial Analysis

Many research projects and everyday activities include some aspect of location. Emerging from early studies in epidemiology and biology, among others, spatial analysis is now used in many fields of study from political science to history to engineering.

This workshop on spatial analysis will cover several exploratory spatial analyses and will provide a resource guide for more advanced types of analysis. In recent years, new tools called Geographic Information Systems or GIS have improved our capacity to perform many types of spatial analysis. In this workshop, you will practice what you learn in the first half of the session by executing some exploratory spatial analysis using GIS software. Datasets will be provided, however, feel free to bring your own personal data.

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Thursday, October 15

10:30 a.m. - Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor — Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Sheila Corrall

The Open Movement in Higher Education

Open approaches have the potential to enhance research, learning, and knowledge exchange on a global scale. Examples in higher education and research now go beyond open source software, open access to research, and open educational resources, to initiatives with open infrastructure and open processes (such as open systems and open peer review). Open developments are gaining momentum from both bottom-up movements and top-down forces. Despite similar goals and evident connections, the various open approaches are typically pursued by separate communities, with relatively few efforts to think and work holistically, and potential benefits are not being realized.

This session will review the range and state of open activities in the higher education arena, explore common
factors for the different open domains, and define potential benefits for individuals and institutions of adopting a more integrated approach to policy and practice. It will conclude by discussing the opportunities and challenges presented by the open agenda for key stakeholder groups (including students, faculty, administrators, and information specialists), encouraging participants to share ideas about the roles they could play and practical steps they might take to promote and advance openness.

This talk will be offered as a part of Open Access Week @ Pitt. Learn more at openaccess.pitt.edu

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Friday, October 2

10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Hillman Library, Ground Floor — Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Berenika Webster

Bibliometrics, altmetrics and social networks to support your research career development

A practical session designed to provide you with an introduction to tools and tips on how to present impact of your research outputs. It will discuss new tools designed to help researchers manage their scholarly visibility and reputation and approaches to presenting impact of your research outputs using citations and other quantitative
measures of impact. Designed for early to midcareer researchers.

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Friday, September 18

10 a.m. - Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor — Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Wei Jeng

Introduction to Tableau: A Data Visualization Tool for Non-CS Researchers and Students

Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers or students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

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Friday, September 25

10 a.m. - Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor — Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Mike Bolam

Introduction to OpenRefine

OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a powerful tool for working with messy tabular data: cleaning it; transforming it from one format into another; extending it with web services; and linking it to databases. The workshop will introduce importing, exploring, sorting, faceting, analyzing and fixing your data.

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ULS/iSchool Digital Scholarship Workshop & Lecture Series - Spring 2015

Friday, April 17

10 a.m .– Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Matt Burton, Visiting Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences, and Postdoctoral Researcher, University Library System

Transforming the Web into Data (with Python)

This workshop will introduce researchers to the methods and techniques of generating research data from the web. We will cover web scraping, APIs, and preparing the collected data for analysis. (Second Paragraph) Some working knowledge of programming and python is desired. Course materials and examples will be drawn from the book "Mining the Social Web, 2nd edition" by Matthew Russell.

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Friday, April 10

10 a.m. – Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Nora Mattern, Visiting Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences, and Postdoctoral Researcher, University Library System

An Introduction to Omeka

This interactive workshop will introduce students to Omeka, a tool that can be used to create online exhibits of digital objects, add contextual information to digital objects, and tell stories with a digital collection. This session will introduce the concept of a "content management system," consider the capabilities that Omeka offers, and spark discussion about how students might use this tool for organizing, enriching, and sharing digital materials. Do you have a collection of digital photographs that you would like to experiment with during the workshop? Feel free to your files along to learn how you might curate them with Omeka!

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Friday, April 3

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Yu-Ru Lin, Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences

Introduction to Data Science for the humanities and social sciences

Data science is a new field that attempts to discover potential insights residing in big data. Over the past few years, the use of big data has hugely impacted many industries and research areas. This talk will introduce data science for people who do not have computational background. The introduction will give a high level picture of data science, covering data science process and its powerful use in a wide range of domains, with a particular emphasis on the use of big data in the humanities and social sciences. Familiarity with basic data analysis concepts is preferred but not essential.

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Friday, March 20

10:00 a.m - 11:30 a.m.
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Wei Jeng, Doctoral Student, School of Information Sciences

Data Visualization Tools for Non-CS Researchers and Students

This workshop is designed to help non-CS researchers and students (especially social scientists and humanists) to discover more possibilities in their data and take full advantage of online data visualization tools.

Tool list:                                                                                               

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Wednesday, March 4

10 a.m. – Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Mike Bolam, Metadata Librarian, University Library System

Introduction to OpenRefine

OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a powerful tool for working with messy tabular data: cleaning it; transforming it from one format into another; extending it with web services; and linking it to databases.  The workshop will introduce importing, exploring, sorting, faceting, analyzing and fixing your data.

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Friday, February 27

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Amelia Acker, Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences

Building a Professional Digital Portfolio with Wordpress

Digital Portfolios are a great way to demonstrate the skills, projects, and expertise that you’ve developed while being a student at Pitt. Digital portfolios can be used to showcase your resumé, professional experience, internships, and digital projects that you have created; including evidence of you demonstrating applied skills and digital tools. Many undergraduates and masters students find that digital portfolios supplement their employment searches before graduating. In this workshop we will explore a range of professional digital portfolios for new graduates; cover free platforms for building a web presence; and then tour a range of Wordpress plugins that support multimedia publishing (including, slidedecks, downloadable pdfs, images, sound, and video). This spring workshop is for early career masters students and undergraduates who about to graduate to build a professional digital portfolio.

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Friday, February 13

10 a.m. – Noon
Hillman Library, Ground Floor— Amy E. Knapp Room

RSVP/Register: click here

Jessica Benner, Doctoral Student, School of Information Sciences
Darryl Bishop, Library Specialist, University Library System

Introduction to Spatial Analysis

Many research projects and everyday activities include some aspect of location. Emerging from early studies in epidemiology and biology, among others, spatial analysis is now used in many fields of study from political science to history to engineering. This workshop on spatial analysis will cover several exploratory spatial analyses and will provide a resource guide for more advanced types of analysis. In recent years, new tools called Geographic Information Systems or GIS have improved our capacity to perform many types of spatial analysis. In this workshop, you will practice what you learn in the first half of the session by executing some exploratory spatial analysis using GIS software. Datasets will be provided, however, feel free to bring your own personal data.

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Colloquia

It is part of the School's mission to disseminate research ideas and findings through Colloquia. New students and faculty enjoy this vibrant intellectual community.